The Epimethean

"I am a fire hazard."

26 notes

huntingtonlibrary:

Today on VERSO, a preview of “Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War,” opening this Saturday (8/2) and running through Nov. 3.

captions:
I Want You for U.S. Army is one of about 40 posters that will go on view beginning Aug. 2 in “Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War.” The poster was made in 1917 by James Montgomery Flagg (1877–1960). The Huntington Library, Art Galleries, and Botanical Gardens.

Treat ‘em Rough / Join the Tanks United States Tank Corps, United States, 1918, August William Hutaf (1879–1942), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Enlist / On Which Side of the Window Are You?, United States, 1917, Laura Brey (dates unknown), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

For Every Fighter a Woman Worker, United States, American Lithographic Co., ca. 1918, Adolph Treidler (1886–1981), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

If You Can’t Enlist—Invest / Buy a Liberty Bond, United States, ca. 1918, Winsor McCay (ca. 1867–1934), color lithograph. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

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bobbycaputo:

Haunting Series Documents Painful Reminders of the First World War

One hundred summers ago this year, the First World War began, setting of a chain of battles that would claim some 16 million lives over the course of four years. For Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace 14-18, photographer Michael St Maur Sheil returns to the Western front, cataloguing its landscapes as they exist today. In contrast to the vast majority World War I photographs picturing renowned generals and bloodied soldiers black and white, Sheil presents a topography healed in part by the passage time and a century’s growth of verdure.

Though lush and luminous, the countryside reveals itself to be irrevocably scarred by events long past; deep trenches and unexploded yet fatally dangerous shells form pocks over the terrain, reminding us of those tragic things which cannot be erased in time. Extending from Swiss territory to the North Sea, this now peaceful Western Front saw the deaths of approximately 8 million young men and millions of horses over the course of a four year stalemate between the French and German troops. New technologies like poisonous gas, tanks, and aircraft allowed for unparalleled fatalities.

(Continue Reading)

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historicalfirearms:

July 28th 1914: Austria-Hungary Declares War on Serbia

The front page of The Washington Times above reports that following the unsatisfactory Serbian response to Austria’s July Ultimatum the Austro-Hungarian Empire have declared war on Serbia.  

The Ultimatum had been drafted to be unacceptable and while Serbia had agreed to all but one of the ten demands Austria took the opportunity to declare war on the small Balkan state on its southern border.   With Germany and Austro-Hungary declining to take part in suggested mediation talks. The declaration of war would suck Russia, Serbia’s ally, into the conflict forcing them to mobilise their forces.  

The resulting mobilisations snowballed Europe into a total war the likes of which it had never seen.  Following Germany’s declaration of war on Russia war between the rest of Europe’s major powers was inevitable.

Image One Source

Image Two Source

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teatimeatwinterpalace:

28th July 1914 - Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia

On July 28, 1914, one month to the day after Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were killed by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, effectively beginning the First World War.

The following telegram sent by Count Leopold von Berchtold (Austro-Hungarian Foreign Minister) at 11.10 am to M. N. Pashitch (Serbian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister), who received it at 12.30 pmVienna28 July 1914The Royal Serbian Government not having answered in a satisfactory manner the note of July 23, 1914, presented by the Austro-Hungarian Minister at Belgrade, the Imperial and Royal Government are themselves compelled to see to the safeguarding of their rights and interests, and, with this object, to have recourse to force of arms.Austria-Hungary consequently considers herself henceforward in state of war with Serbia.Count Berchtold

teatimeatwinterpalace:

28th July 1914 - Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia

On July 28, 1914, one month to the day after Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife were killed by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Austria-Hungary declares war on Serbia, effectively beginning the First World War.

The following telegram sent by Count Leopold von Berchtold (Austro-Hungarian Foreign Minister) at 11.10 am to M. N. Pashitch (Serbian Prime Minister and Foreign Minister), who received it at 12.30 pm

Vienna
28 July 1914

The Royal Serbian Government not having answered in a satisfactory manner the note of July 23, 1914, presented by the Austro-Hungarian Minister at Belgrade, the Imperial and Royal Government are themselves compelled to see to the safeguarding of their rights and interests, and, with this object, to have recourse to force of arms.

Austria-Hungary consequently considers herself henceforward in state of war with Serbia.

Count Berchtold

2 notes

U.S.A and the First World War

worldwari:

Though the United States did not join the war directly until 1917, we were in the war from the very beginning. Because the U.S was friends with England and France, we supplied weapons and ammo to those countries from the beginning. When we began fighting in the war in 1917, the reasons were…